Bikes & Tech
Old 26" wheels and new 29" wheels. Sooner or...

Sea Otter Gallery: New Stumpjumper, more wood bikes, vintage MTB

A look at the new Stumpjumper, vintage rides, more wood bikes, and Marin's custom-painted Wolf Ridge.
Sea Ottter 2018: Vintage
Specialized showed off a vintage bike, its 1981 Sumpjumper. Except in this case, it was a way for it to promote something new. Photo: Spencer Powlison | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: New Stumpjumper
The new Stumpjumper has two travel options: ST (120/130mm travel) and a longer-travel 140/150mm option. In both cases, you can choose between 27.5- and 29-inch wheels. Photo: Spencer Powlison | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: New Stumpjumper
Specialized calls the new frame’s shock junction area the Sidearm, due to its asymmetric shape. As you’d expect, this design is meant to be lighter and stiffer. Photo: Spencer Powlison | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Old and new wheels
Old 26″ wheels and new 29″ wheels. Sooner or later, Specialized should bring back those skinwall tires, right? Photo: Spencer Powlison | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Knog
The Knog PWR family of lights and accessories relies on the cylindrical battery packs that have both a USB output port, a mini USB input port, and a deep hole that a clip snaps into to hold the hight or another accessory on. The battery stands up on a little base and then plugs into a camping lantern in the foreground. It also fits inside the speaker and drives it. All of the various headlights, including the wire for the helmet-mount light, plug into the battery pack, which is itself offered in two different sizes. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Pacenti
Pacenti D-Dent handlebar with its wide-clamp, 20mm-long stem. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Pacenti
The notch in Pacenti’s D-Dent handlebar fits around the steering tube, allowing a super-short stem (20mm) not possible with other handlebars. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Argon18
Argon 18 company founder Gervais Rioux about to unveil his new bike. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Argon18
The dark cover coming off of the Dark Matter gravel road race bike. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Argon18
Plastic protective down tube protector under the 3rd bottle cage mount and metal chainstay chain-suck protective plate with moisture weep holes on the Dark Matter. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Argon18
Each Argon18 bike comes with this “3D System” kit; it contains head-tube-extending press-in headset top cups of various extensions (0, 15, and 30mm) and plastic head tube/headset cover/top caps of various heights (0, 15, and 30mm) to cover them and make the bike look finished no matter the spacer height the customer chooses. The kit also includes plastic internal-wire covers and stops for any kind of shifting system. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Argon18
The Argon18 Dark Matter can be run with a front derailleur by adding this bolt-on front-derailleur mount under the seat-tube bottle cage. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: NotioKonect
Gervais Rioux’s NotioKonect unit to integrate all ride and rider data in one downloadable unit. The rod sticking out the front senses wind speed and direction. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: RTS 1
Retro bikes are always popular at Sea Otter. GT showed off a few vintage beauties like this RTS 1. Although it had a few newer parts, like the RockShox Sid fork, it was still pretty cool. Photo: Spencer Powlison | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: LTS
GT also displayed its fabled LTS full-suspension bike, complete with the yellow RockShox Judy SL (swoon) and lots of red anodized parts. Photo: Spencer Powlison | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Onza
Anodized Onza bar-ends are a trip down memory lane for any mountain biker from the 1990s. Photo: Spencer Powlison | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Niner Rip 9
Niner showed off an updated version of its Rip 9 RDO. The biggest change is that the frame now has cleaner internal cable routing. Photo: Spencer Powlison | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Niner bag
Frame bags abounded at Sea Otter. Here we have Niner’s SIR 9 hardtail with a custom, made in Colorado Defiant Pack. Photo: Spencer Powlison | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Sur Airstream
Eric Engel and Jackie Cronin are on a 40-week tour. But they’re doing more than just representing Sur and its plant-based supplement product AltRed. They’re racing as many as 50 triathlons along the way and planning to qualify for Ironman. Photo: Spencer Powlison | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Airstream
Inside the Airstream, they’ve got a pretty dialed set-up for stationary workouts, Zwift, and of course, promoting AltRed. The supplement contains just one ingredient, Betalain, which is extracted from beets. Photo: Spencer Powlison | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Fabric
British saddle company Fabric’s new ALM saddle was developed along with Airbus and has a carbon shell and integrated rails molded as a single piece of carbon. The rails meet the shell way out at its tip and tail, thus maximizing the ability of the rails and shell to flex. The padded cover is bonded on. The ALM sells for $360 and weighs 140 grams. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Fabric
The top of the ALM is bonded onto the carbon base. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Bolle
Bollé is not the only sunglasses company to offer glasses with Trivex lenses, but it claims to use it in more models and at lower price points than any other optics company. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Bolle
On the Abbe scale of optical clarity, glass rates at the top with a score of 54, while polycarbonate lenses only rate a score of 28. Trivex scores a 45 while being much lighter than grass and as impact resistant as polycarbonate. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Renovo
The Renovo Aerowood is a gorgeous machine whose dark lines are a layer of African wenge wood. It can be repaired after a crash by laminating some new wood on. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Renovo
A huge 5-axis CNC machine precisely hollows out the inside of each half of a Renovo frame, allowing the company to produce a high volume of wooden bike frames. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Renovo
After the frame member is hollowed out, it is flipped over, and the same 5-axis CNC machine precisely carves its outer shape. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Renovo
The bottom bracket shell of a Renovo frame is aluminum and splined on the outside to bond into the wooden frame with out slippage. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Renovo
The inside of the seat tube of a Renovo gets either an aluminum or carbon-fiber sleeve bonded inside. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Marin
This Marin Wolf Ridge wolf-fur theme bike was painted by Tony Baumann at Made Rad by Tony. Notice the wolf-fur pattern on the ENVE logos on the rims and the Fox logos on the fork. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Marin
This large, orange piece passing over the bottom bracket on a Marin Wolf Ridge is a big cylinder that slides over a large shaft attached ahead of the bottom bracket to keep the front and rear ends lined up. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Smith
The Koroyd honeycomb side panel is visible on this Smith Network matte-finish helmet, which otherwise protects the rider’s head with standard EPS foam. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Smith
This limited-edition Smith Network helmet was made for the Team Cinelli Chrome fixie-racing team. Photo: Lennard Zinn | VeloNews.com
Sea Ottter 2018: Otter
Sea you next year! Photo: Spencer Powlison | VeloNews.com

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