News
It is hard to tell the scale from the photo, but...

Gallery: Celebrating 200 years of the bicycle

Have a look at this vintage collection at the Musée du Vélo, located in Tournus, France.
Musée du Vélo: Main entry
The Musée du Vélo was originally in Cormatin, France, from 1997 to 2007. It had to close its doors for financial reasons, but it later re-opened in Tournus, France, in 2009. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Dandy-horse
In 1817, German Baron Karl Von Drais invented the dandy-horse. Ridden like a strider bike, the dandy-horse is the first known bicycle and was patented in 1818. This 1820 version was used by Von Drais to cover 14.4km in one hour. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Adjustable saddle
There was even a three-level saddle height adjustment on the dandy-horse from 1820. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Pennyfarthings
Pennyfarthings big and small. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Hand brake
Shown here is the braking system from an 1869 bicycle. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Delivery trike
Michel Grezaud, the founder of Musée du Vélo, collected bikes and bike-related items for 40 years. He was a butcher in the 1950s, and used this old milkman delivery tricycle to deliver his meats to his customers. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Mini peloton
A miniature peloton of figurines. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Child's bike
It is hard to tell the scale from the photo, but this Peugeot wooden bicycle is sized for a child. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Child seat
This early front-mounted child seat was equiped with arm rests, foot rests, and a seatbelt. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Child's tandem
A child’s tandem bicycle, complete with pink saddles. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Triplet
With drop bars in front and mustache bars in back, this triplet bicycle dates back to 1938. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Bells
“On your left!” A beautiful collection of bicycle bells. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Tour de France poster
The 29th edition of the Tour de France in 1935 was won by Belgian Romain Maes. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Derailleur
In 1937, the derailleur made its debut at the Tour de France. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Downtube shifter
A downtube shifter on a 1937 Tour de France bicycle. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Needlepoint
Handmade needle work scenes of European cycling. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Two-wheel drive
This 1950 bicycle could be driven by pedaling but also by pumping the handlebars from side to side. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Large chainring
This bicycle may have been used to attempt a speed record at one time by the looks of the huge chainring. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Velo china
A collection of velo-inspired china. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Drivetrain
Note the very interesting gearing on this Levocyclette “Terrot.” Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Velo cigars
Cigars and matchboxes of cycling greats. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Swiss Military
The Swiss Military bicycle was in production for 90 years, from 1905 to 1995. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Front suspension
A front suspension bicycle from 1935. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Head badges
The museum has an extensive collection of vintage head badges. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Geometric tubing
This 1935 aluminium-lugged bicycle has octagonal tubing. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Plastic bike
An all-plastic bicycle, with the exception of a few parts, was built by Itera in the 1980’s. Photo: Brad Kaminski
Musée du Vélo: Lefty righty
Lefty! No, righty! This wild bicycle has a lefty fork and righty stays. Photo: Brad Kaminski