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To promote its new version of the Podium,...

Gallery: Phil Gaimon’s ‘Cookie Bike’

Phil Gaimon's special one-off Diamondback, pro-peloton aero with a cookie-covered custom paintjob, will be auctioned for charity
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
To promote its new version of the Podium, Diamondback commissioned this one-off frame to be painted for Optum Pro Cycling’s Phil Gaimon. The paint sports a strong focus on Gaimon’s love for cookies. There is just one problem — this bike is a 58cm. Gaimon rides a 56cm. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
This bike was created for the UnitedHeatlthcare Children’s Foundation to use in a charity auction. Gaimon will race on a version of this bike, in a 56cm, in future races. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
The new Podium’s seat tube flares into a more drastic Kamm-tailed shape as it gets closer to the rear wheel and the bottom bracket. At the top tube junction, the seat tube is perfectly round. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
Optum is racing on Kenda tubulars that are only stamped with an SC logo — short for “Service Course.” Kenda could not be reached for immediate comment on the debadged tubulars. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
The Podium uses large plugs for the front and rear derailleur, which can be swapped out and closed up if the rider wants to use an electronic drivetrain. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
The aluminum Hed GTO bar uses a classic round shape. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
The Podium comes equipped with a proprietary-shaped headset cap that normally fills the void behind the headset. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
Gaimon rides a traditional 53/39 chainring combination. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
ISM saddles are becoming increasingly popular on time trial and triathlon bikes, but Optum uses its Attack road saddles on their everyday-bikes. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
The GTO bars and stem stand for Grand Tour Oversized. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
All those cookies and milk on the top tube will keep Gaimon hungry once he gets his own bike. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
More miles equals more cookies. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
The lack of a non-traditional seatpost collar keeps things clean at the top tube – seat tube junction. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
The seatpost binder compression piece is similar to that of the Serios time trial bike. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
Optum mechanics uses a Jagwire Thinline cable adjuster for getting the right tension on the SRAM Yaw front deraileur. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
Gallery: Phil Gaimon's 'Cookie Bike'
Gaimon will race most days with a Hed Stinger 5 front wheel and a Stinger 6 rear wheel. On hillier days he might opt for the shallower Stinger 3. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com