SRAM Force CX1
We first spotted a CX1 prototype at the Bend stop of the 2012 US Gran Prix of Cyclocross. Ryan Trebon of Cannondale-Cyclocrossworld.com was riding an early prototype of the chainring paired to a SRAM Red 10-speed rear derailleur. Photo: Wil Matthews | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
At the 2013 Toyota Cincy3 Cyclocross Festival, Ryan Trebon was on a more developed version of the CX1 group, this time with a prototype rear derailleur. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
Trebon’s bike had a full CX1 group at the national championship in Boulder in mid January. The design appeared final, though the finish was not. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
While lacking logos, Trebon’s drivetrain in Boulder was very close to final production, though we still had to sneak photos during his pre-ride. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
The cranks and chainrings now feature their final graphics, which match up well with the rest of SRAM’s standard Force group. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
The focus of the SRAM Force CX1 group is the rear derailleur and the chainrings. SRAM has made it easy on existing SRAM riders, who can get away with purchasing only a rear derailleur and a chainring, assuming they ride a compact crank. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
SRAM will sell a Force CX1 specific cranks for $148 and $182 for the GXP and BB30 versions, respectively. The cranks are identical to Force carbon cranks already on the market, except with CX1 graphics. They will be sold without chainrings. Riders with any current 110BCD crank can run the Force CX1 drivetrain by purchasing just a chainring. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
The Force CX1 group uses the same tall teeth and wide-narrow tooth pattern as SRAM’s one-by mountain bike groups. It’s proven to be an effective, secure design in our time mountain biking on XX1 equipped bikes. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
The bike we tested was equipped with a 42-tooth chainring and an 11-28 cassette. We found the gearing to be suitable for an easy spin on the road, but we would opt for the 40-tooth chainring for a cyclocross bike. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
The single chainring is designed to mount where a big ring would, and is offset so that the chainline is in the center of the crank’s bolt pattern. This makes the drivetrain more efficient in all 10 or 11 speeds. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
The Force CX1 rear derailleur is SRAM road 10 and 11 speed compatible, again making it easy on riders to upgrade their current cyclocross drivetrains. Though the rear derailleur is pricey, at $235. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
The Force CX1 rear derailleur is not a rebadged XO1 rear derailleur with cyclocross specific cage lengths. Unlike its XX1 and XO1 cousins, the Force CX1 rear derailleur sports a barrel adjuster and has a different action so it is not cross compatible with XO1 and XX1 shifters. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
Sealed cartridge bearings are used inside 12 tooth pulley wheels on the SRAM Force CX1 rear derailleur. Force 22 rear derailleurs use 11 tooth pulley wheels. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
The CX1 right shifter looks identical to a Force shifter.
SRAM Force CX1
SRAM will sell a CX1 specific left lever. It’s simply a Force lever with the shifter internals stripped out, and rebadged. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
The lack of shifter internals does make the hood feel a bit unfinished with a large hole behind the brake lever. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com
SRAM Force CX1
The CX1 graphics are easily mistaken for Force 22 —  a purposeful look designed to make the groups largely interchangeable. Photo: Logan VonBokel | VeloNews.com