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Filippo Pozzatto will ride this Merida Reacto Evo...

Pro Bike: Filippo Pozzato’s Merida Reacto Evo

Filippo Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo for the Tour of Flanders
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
Filippo Pozzatto will ride this Merida Reacto Evo aero road frame for the Tour of Flanders, before switching to the comfort-oriented Ride model for Roubaix. The Reacto uses Kamm-tail aero shapes throughout, with very similar shapes to the BMC TMR01. The brakes are Shimano’s new dual-bolt units, the same as those used on the updated Trek Madone.

The 6-foot tall Pozzato has a saddle height of 80.8cm and reach of 64cm. He has a 130mm stem on his Reacto Ovo, and rides on 172.5mm cranks. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
NACA Fastback Aero Profiles means, essentially, that the company has taken National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics profiles and lopped the back end off, trimming the trailing edges to aid in the smooth reintegration of air. It’s the same essential aero concept that is used on the Trek Speed Concept, Scott Foil, BMC TMR01, Trek Madone, and the Honda Prius (among many other cars). Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
Pozzato has opted to use carbon wheels, Fulcrum’s Racing L model, at the Ronde van Vlaanderen. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
Paired with those carbon rims are Continental Competition 25mm tires. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
Pozzato will run an 11-25 cassette with a 53/39 crankset for Flanders. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
The Concor has long been popular among pros, and its latest shape change hasn’t diminished that one bit. Pozzato runs the carbon-railed version well back on its rails. The S-Flex seatpost is designed to provide a bit of give, using an elastomer material to allow for a controlled rearward bend. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
A 130 stem on Pozzato’s Merida. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
The Reacto Evo hasn’t officially hit Merida’s lineup yet. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
Carbon rails on the Concor. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
Pozzato will run an SRM power meter for the big day, but his computer was elsewhere. In-line cable adjusters, visible on the housing, allow for on-the-fly rear derailleur adjustment. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
Shimano’s new 9000-series brakes use two mount bolts. The same design is used on the new Trek Madone. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
The rear brake is hidden under the BB, as on the Madone. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
UCI-approved, of course. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
The Reacto Evo. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
Round drops for Pozzato. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
The skinny fork and overhanging head tube look very similar to the new Madone. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
While the rear end looks like the BMC TMR01 or the new Giant Propel. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
That familiar overhang. Get used to the look as more companies pick up Shimano’s dual-bolt brake design. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
Fat stays mounted low on the seat tube. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
No brake on the stays, only sleek shapes. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
Neatly integrated Di2 routing. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
X-Taper refers to the large bearings but skinny middle section of the head tube. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com
Pozzato's Merida Reacto Evo
Bright. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com