The new Ridley FB features integrated braking, but you better move fast if you want one.

The 2012 Ridley Noah FB
The 2012 Ridley Noah FB, spotted in the wild for the first time. The new Noah’s major claim to fame is its use of fully integrated brakes, built right into the fork and seat stays. It will be available around April, 2012 in the U.S. and will cost you $5395 for the frame and fork only. Only about 25 bikes are alloted for sale in the U.S.
The 2012 Ridley Noah FB
The front brake is part of the fork, and is basically a V-brake using its own carbon fiber arms as leaf springs. A quick squeeze of the brake levers (no riding this pre-production bike) yields a stiff feeling brake.
The 2012 Ridley Noah FB
Very clean lines, with only the front brake cable and small Dura-Ace Di2 cables visible. No brake in sight, since it’s tucked behind the fork.
The 2012 Ridley Noah FB
The rear brake functions the same as the front. It’s built right into the seat stay, and uses the carbon itself as a leaf spring to pull the arms back out.
The 2012 Ridley Noah FB
More smooth lines.
The 2012 Ridley Noah FB
The model I saw was set up for Di2, but for next year all Noah models can be easily swapped between mechanical and electronic cabling. Routing on the new Noah is very clean.
The 2012 Ridley Noah FB
Those tiny springs at the bottom allow the brakes to be centered.
The 2012 Ridley Noah FB
FB stands for Fast Brake – Ridley says it’s more aerodynamic (and thus faster) than regular brakes.
The 2012 Ridley Noah FB
More clean routing. If mechanical shifting is used, that hole is plugged and the cables are routed under the BB and up through a small hole.
The 2012 Ridley Noah FB
The new Noah started a journalist feeding frenzy. We’re like magpies.
The 2012 Ridley Noah FB
The Di2 battery mounts under the saddle to keep it out of the wind.
The 2012 Ridley Noah FB
Quite a slim profile.