Epic letters on LeMond, game theory and lawsuits

The Mailbag is a regular department on VeloNews.com. Write to webletters@insideinc.com. Please include your full name, hometown and state or nation. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Writers are encouraged to limit their submissions to one letter per month. The letters published should not be viewed as reflecting the opinions, policies or positions of VeloNews.com, VeloNews magazine or our parent company.


Unsubstantiated allegations
Dear Velo,

The Mailbag is a regular department on VeloNews.com. Write to webletters@insideinc.com. Please include your full name, hometown and state or nation. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Writers are encouraged to limit their submissions to one letter per month. The letters published should not be viewed as reflecting the opinions, policies or positions of VeloNews.com, VeloNews magazine or our parent company.


Unsubstantiated allegations
Dear Velo,
Most of the pro-LeMond crowd praise him for speaking about the dopers. From what I see, he makes unsubstantial allegations with no supporting documents. Unless I am mistaken, he testified at Floyd’s trial with rumor and innuendo.

I especially like the comment by Mr. Buttery that Lance is only interested in promoting Lance … which is why my yellow wristband says “LANCESTRONG” on it, right?
Aaron Santry
McConnell AFB, Kansas

Game theory and dopers
Dear VeloNews,
I would like to add just one more “BOO Trek” letter. I definitely won’t be buying a Trek anything from here on out.

As for LeMond’s, and everybody’s, criticism of the drug culture, I think everyone should read Michael Shermer’s article in the March 2008 Scientific American.

I think Shermer has an idea how to push the “cleanup” forward, though I could also see the possibility of a McCarthyesque witch-hunt. I am sure controls and rules could be put in place to prevent that. Shermer is a smart guy, and knows cycling (RAAM Veteran) it is well worth a read and some debate. I hope VeloNews can do an interview with him, or reprint the Scientific American article.
Larry Parker
Cincinnati, Ohio

Ball caused his own problems
Editors,
For what Michael Ball of Rock Racing is spending on his team of layers to sue the Tour of Georgia, he could have paid to UCI to make sure he had a Pro Continental team. If they had filed for that status, the team would have automatically been invited to Georgia. End of story.

Rock fans should be pissed, not supportive. This is not the team’s first year.

Mr. Ball, please figure the system out so we can see what your team can do, otherwise go back to the fashion runways in LA. Good racing is what I want, not tabloid stories.
Mike Spilker
Middlesex, New Jersey

You don’t make friends by suing
Dear editors,
If Michael Ball is crying in his energy drink because he didn’t get into the Tour of Georgia, then suing the organizers is the last thing he should do. Maybe he should try making friends instead of alienating everyone who doesn’t share his world view.

Maybe he should take the money he is devoting to his lawsuit, add it to all the money he seems to throw around on Rolls Royces and entourages and put up some seed cash for a race of his own. At least then he’ll know that he’s invited. Maybe he’ll even invite Astana to the Tour of the Maligned.
Norm Kittleson
Whitehall, Michigan

An epic letter from an epic reader
Hey VeloNews,
I love the site, the redesign, everything… well, except your over-use of the word “epic.” It popped up again today in your caption to the photo of the U.S. Open race last year. It seems like you’re saying “epic conditions” to sugar-coat the more accurate “cold, rainy, crappy, miserable weather” or something like that.

Let’s save “epic” for those truly great, maybe once-a-year rides.
Thanks.
Paul Thomas

Well give it a shot, Paul, especially now that we convinced the caption writer to stop using “awesome.” – Editor

Remembering Sloane
Dear VeloNews,
I must say that I have been very touched by the internet response to the death of my father, Gene Sloane. I am not completely surprised, however. Although the bicycle industry pedaled past him some time ago, I know his books built up a lot of goodwill with many, many people and I am glad the word got out. As dated as much of his stuff is now (his last edition came out over 12 years ago), I have been particularly impressed with how many people still remember and/or consult his writing for information.

My favorite comment was the note from one of your readers; Dr. Nahrstedt included a quote from my father’s book: “There’s something about a man on a bicycle that brings out the worst in a dog” that in my view, was quintessentially Gene.
Nick Sloane
Bloomingdale, Illinois