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Fast Talk podcast, ep. 35: How to train in the cold

The VeloNews Fast Talk podcast is your source for the best advice and most interesting insight on what it takes to become a better cyclist. Listen in as VeloNews managing editor Chris Case and columnist Trevor Connor discuss a range of topics, including training, physiology, technology, and more.

Are you getting out to ride this winter? This podcast covers the physiological effects of training in the cold, from muscle damage to the increased caloric demands. We also discuss tips and tricks to set up your bike, stay warm, and even keep your bottles from freezing. And if it’s just too darn cold, we explain the best way to balance time indoors on the trainer with outdoor rides.

We speak with Dr. Stephen Cheung, Dr. Iñigo San Millan, Trek-Segafredo pro rider Kiel Reijnen, and former cyclocross champion Tim Johnson about the best ways to get fit this winter.

Fast Talk is available on all your favorite podcast services, including iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and Soundcloud. If you enjoy the podcast, please consider taking a moment to rate and comment on iTunes after listening. Also, check out the VeloNews Cycling Podcast, our weekly discussion of the sport’s hottest topics, trends, and controversies.

References

Cheung, S. S. (2010). Advanced environmental exercise physiology. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

Oksa, J., Ducharme, M. B., & Rintamaki, H. (2002). Combined effect of repetitive work and cold on muscle function and fatigue. Journal of Applied Physiology (1985), 92(1), 354-361.

Rissanen, S., Oksa, J., Rintamaki, H., & Tokura, H. (1996). Effects of leg covering in humans on muscle activity and thermal responses in a cool environment. European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, 73(1-2), 163-168.

Scott, E. E., Hamilton, D. F., Wallace, R. J., Muir, A. Y., & Simpson, A. H. (2016). Increased risk of muscle tears below physiological temperature ranges. Bone Joint Research, 5(2), 61-65.

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