Stat sheet: The 2018 Tour de France route

As befits cycling’s biggest race, we’ve covered the 2018 Tour de France route announcement extensively, from the five key stages to the cobblestones to our roundtable about how we see this race unfolding. So let’s boil down the news to the fundamentals. Here are some of the 2018 Tour’s key stats, as well as select route and climb profiles from the presentation.

Overall route

3,329 kilometers in total, the shortest Tour since 2002
65km: Shortest road stage (stage 17)
231km: Longest road stage (stage 7)

The 21 stages

8 flat
5 hilly
6 mountain stages
3 summit finishes (La Rosière, Alpe d’Huez, Saint-Lary-Soulan col de Portet)
1 individual time trial
1 team time trial

15 kilometers in Spain — otherwise the route is entirely on French soil.

Stage 9’s cobblestones

21.7km of pavé in stage 9
15 sectors of cobblestones
500m: Shortest cobble sector
2.7km: Longest cobble sector

Key climbing stages

Stage 6

Stage 6 finishes on the steep, short Mur de Bretagne climb.

Stage 10

Stage 10 is this Tour’s first foray into the Alps.

Stage 10

Stage 10 finishes on the Col de la Colombiere.

Stage 11

Stage 11 is a mountainous day and one of the Tour’s three summit finishes.

Stage 11

Stage 11 finishes on La Rosiere

Stage 12

Stage 12 features a summit finish on Alpe d’Huez.

Stage 12

Alpe d’Huez is perhaps the Tour’s most famous climb.

Stage 16

Stage 16 brings the Tour into the Pyrenees.

Stage 16

Stage 16 finishes with a short climb up the Portillon and a precipitous descent to Bagneres-de-Luchon.

Stage 17

Stage 17 is exceptionally short at 64km with more than 3,000 meters of climbing.

Stage 17

Col de Portet is a steep, long climb with a high altitude finish.

Stage 19

The Tour’s final day of climbing is a monster, with trips over the Col d’Aspin, Tourmalet, Soulor, and Aubisque.

Stage 19

Col d’Aubisque, when climbed from this direction, includes the Soulor.